As the self-contained metallic cartridge was being developed in the 1800’s, many firearms manufacturers and private gunsmiths were busy converting the cap and ball arms to metallic cartridge models, more commonly known as “conversions.” Cimarron has taken the guns from this era and improved them as replicas for the modern shooter.

Rather than convert the older percussion arms, the Remington factory began manufacturing their popular New Model Army revolvers as metallic cartridge guns. The 1858 New Model Army–a .44 bore handgun–was originally converted to either .46 rimfire or .44 rimfire and centerfire metallic cartridges and priced for the civilian trade at a whopping $9 per copy. On the other hand, the New Model Navy revolvers were percussion arms returned to Remington by the U.S. Navy to be converted to .38 centerfire. Reproduced from an original new model army from the Cimarron collection and now available in Standard Blue and color case hardened, Cimarron’s 1858 New Model Army can be had with either the 5 1/2-inch, or the 8-inch octagon barrel, in your choice of .45 Colt, .44-40, or .38 Special (in 5 1/2-inch barrel). A 7 3/8-inch barreled New Model Navy, chambered for the .38 Special cartridge is also available. Both versions have ejector rods. Cimarron’s replica Remington New Model Army or Navy looks and handles like the real deal!
Patented July 2, 1872, Colt employees Charles B. Richards and William Mason, combined their ideas for converting Colt’s percussion revolvers to self-contained metallic cartridge, breech loading arms. Originally working with the percussion arms parts already in stock, guns were converted, however as they began to run out of the cap and ball components, the company began producing new sixguns as metal cartridge arms, rather than conversions. Although the numbers produced only amounted to a few thousand specimens (around 2,100 1860 Army models and about 3,800 1851 Navy models). El Paso’s city marshal Dallas Stoudenmire packed a cut down Richards-Mason Army Colt. and John H. “Doc” Holliday packed a ’51 new-made Navy model. Today’s shooters enjoy the looks and handling capabilities of these conversion revolvers that combine the sleek lines of percussion revolvers with the convenience of self-contained cartridge sixguns. Due to the high cost and scarcity of originals, Cimarron’s Richards-Mason conversions are ideal for Cowboy Action competitors as well as nostalgic gun buffs alike. The Army model, copied from an original in our antique collection, sports a Standard Blue finish, while Cimarron’s Navy model wears a Black finish. Both models are offered in a choice of .45 Colt, .44 Colt and Russian, .38 Colt/Special, or .45 Schofield caliber, and in either a 5 1/2-inch barrel or the 8-inch barrel length. In the Original Finish, antique arms enthusiasts will swear you have the “gen-u-wine” article!
Patented July 2, 1872, Colt employees Charles B. Richards and William Mason, combined their ideas for converting Colt’s percussion revolvers to self-contained metallic cartridge, breech loading arms. Originally working with the percussion arms parts already in stock, guns were converted, however as they began to run out of the cap and ball components, the company began producing new sixguns as metal cartridge arms, rather than conversions. Although the numbers produced only amounted to a few thousand specimens (around 2,100 1860 Army models and about 3,800 1851 Navy models). El Paso’s city marshal Dallas Stoudenmire packed a cut down Richards-Mason Army Colt. and John H. “Doc” Holliday packed a ’51 new-made Navy model. Today’s shooters enjoy the looks and handling capabilities of these conversion revolvers that combine the sleek lines of percussion revolvers with the convenience of self-contained cartridge sixguns. Due to the high cost and scarcity of originals, Cimarron’s Richards-Mason conversions are ideal for Cowboy Action competitors as well as nostalgic gun buffs alike. The Army model, copied from an original in our antique collection, sports a Standard Blue finish, while Cimarron’s Navy model wears a Black finish. Both models are offered in a choice of .45 Colt, .44 Colt and Russian, .38 Colt/Special, or .45 Schofield caliber, and in either a 5 1/2-inch barrel or the 8-inch barrel length. In the Original Finish, antique arms enthusiasts will swear you have the “gen-u-wine” article!

 

Meet Ryan Hoover, Gunsmith from RH Custom Guns
Cimarron Firearms 2018 Catalog
Download a copy or buy one here.
Did you know you can special order most of our guns in special finishes like Charcoal Blue or Original Finish? Contact us for a quote!
Cimarron and Texas Jack have provided many items to your favorite westerns over the years….and we also carry many items from your favorite westerns as well. We’ve organized them by film here, so you can look like you stepped right out of the old west, from head to toe.
Cimarron Firearms has completely changed the look and feel of modern replica firearms. For more information on this, visit our page Why Cimarron is the Best Buy.

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