We all do it. We pour a handful of ammo out of the box, stuff it into magazines and then go blasting. However, you should not do that with the ammo you will use in concealed carry. Why? Because, as a friend of mine has been known to say, “It is Murphy’s law, not Murphy’s suggestion.”

I’ve pulled bad ammo out of boxes. I’ve seen it on the range and in classes. Bad ammo happens to good people, and as hard as the factories work to prevent it, it always will. After all, there is nothing made by the hand of man that is perfect.

Bad ammo may be a one-in-a-million occurrence, but we all know when it will happen to us: When you can least afford it. So check your concealed carry ammo, and it would be good if you followed this sequence.

This misshapen nose probably won’t cause a problem feeding, especially since it is a revolver round. But would it expand properly, if needed? (courtesy of gunsandammo.com)
This misshapen nose probably won’t cause a problem feeding, especially since it is a revolver round. But would it expand properly, if needed?
(courtesy of gunsandammo.com)

Check the Box

Just recently, I received a shipment of ammo that was mislabeled. The carton said .357 Magnum. The individual box labels said .357 Sig. Inside was .357 Magnum ammo. If you had gotten the boxes and not looked, you would have been really annoyed. You bought what you thought was .357 Sig for your pistol and instead would have gotten .357 Magnum for your revolver. While they are ballistically equivalent, they are not functionally equivalent.

Open the box. Look at the ammo. Check the headstamp. If it doesn’t look right, find out why, and get the right stuff.

Read more – Guns and Ammo

(Featured image courtesy of thearmsguide.com)