March 11, 2013

The United States’ Slippery Slope to Syria

The U.S. policy on aid to Syria is tilting dangerously in the direction of military support. There are many who believe that the situation in Syria should be treated similar to the regime overthrow in Libya. It has become increasingly normal to see media outlets using the ‘cookie cutter’ method in their analysis of countries within Northern Africa, the Middle East, and Southwest Asia.

“Oh, these countries contain Muslims and it’s hot there, they must be the same.”

These countries are not identical, as seen in the United States war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan. For many years, the two countries were militarily approached in a similar way and we are seeing how that is turning out. Almost 12 years of fighting in Afghanistan, and an Iraq that is in shambles, are examples of why these conflicts should not be viewed with a cookie cutter eye piece.

Recently, Secretary of State John Kerry spoke at a joint press conference at Doha’s al-Wajba Palace with Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber al-Thani. Kerry stated that he believes that weapons are reaching Syrian rebels, and that the United States supports such efforts. He also said that the U.S. had yet to and will not directly send weapons to the Syrian rebels.


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About the Author

I served in 3rd Battalion 75th Ranger Regiment from 2003-2008. Almost four years of the time spent in 3/75 was spent in the sniper section. I am a graduate of US Army Airborne School, US Army Ranger School, US Army Sniper School, Special Forces Sniper Course, and the US Marine Corps Summer Mountain Scout Sniper Course. I have competed in the US Army International Sniper Competition as well as the US Army Small Arms Championships on three separate occasions. I currently live in Corvallis, Oregon and hold a Bachelors of Science in Biology from Oregon State University.

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  • Minou_Demimonde

    HugeFan isaiahzb Didn't sound rhetorical to me at all. Sounded like a valid question.

  • GraceMascorro

    @Surf375 Maybe but very risky.

  • Surf375

    @isaiahzb     Except that they would be organic there, with resources necessary to sustain a strong state and no reverse aliyah (emigration, 'yeridah') phenomenon necessitating non-Jewish immigration (ie, Filipinos, Africans, etc.).   Use the unrest in both Iraq and Syria to broker this and convince Turkey that a stopgap to jihadism is necessary, add some EU/NATO carrots for more enticing, I'm sure a deal can be cobbled.    The Jewish experiment is failing (or will fail).

  • oldSquid

    hell, sounds like the shit on your 214 would make you a perfect candidate for office these days.

  • isaiahzb

    @Surf375 Wow, that would be like Israel version 2.0. A country surrounded by countries that want the entire population euthanized.