Looking for the true motive behind No Easy Day begs the question: Why would any SEAL knowingly ostracize himself from his own community? Which in turn makes you wonder: What if he had already been ostracized and treated poorly? Would he want to set the record straight? Settle a score? Prove a point?

What the media and general public don’t know is that the SEAL community (especially Army Special Forces) has a tendency to eat their own. SEAL sources say that Bissonnette was treated very poorly upon his departure from {redacted}, and was asked to leave his assault team, {redacted}, once he openly shared with his teammates that he was considering getting out of the Navy to pursue other interests.

How was he repaid for his honesty and fourteen years of service? He was ostracized from his unit without any notice and handed a plane ticket back to Virginia from a training operation. There are other details associated with his sudden departure, but they are too speculative to share.

What do you do when you find yourself pissed off at your former employer, out of a job, and in need of a paycheck? You start cashing in chips.

It is our assessment that his former Command mishandled his departure, which contributed to his motive for writing this book, and what has been seen by the active duty SEAL community as a betrayal of trust.

(Read Chapter 5, The U.S. Special Operations Community Reaction)

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