Facebook was already dying a slow death before clearly drawing a liberal line in the sand and punishing anyone that went against its new and ever-changing norms.

For the record, I’ve been a registered Independent since about 2007. I am fiscally conservative, pro-free market, think that less government is better, believe that politicians should stay out of our bedrooms, and the government should let people decide what to do with their own bodies. That’s my short version. I’m glad to talk more about it in the comments below.

I’ve personally been on the bad side of Facebook’s funky rules and ever wildly changing moral compass swings: it’s as fun as getting one of those rubber dodge balls right in the jimmy during PE class.

We’ve all been there, am I right gents?

There was a time when our company spent two million a month in Facebook advertising because we could make four million back prior to selling Crate Club in 2020. Those were the golden days before the platform became scared of its own shadow. I’ve heard that any campaign is hard to scale now.

We pulled off the platform as a paid advertiser once Crate Club was out of the mix because we grew tired of getting beaten down from liberal storm squalls that rained down bias against military content.

Facebook would clearly auto-associate anything military with hardcore right-wing agenda and penalize us.

Choosing sides: How the media failed the American people

Read Next: Choosing sides: How the media failed the American people

“No scary military photos or your ADs will get banned,” our 20-something Facebook representative of the week would tell us.

“You can’t donate to a military charity with an advertising campaign unless you’re approved for political advertising,” we were told as our Veterans Day campaign plug was yanked.

So when I recently listened to Rogan’s interview of my close friend’s brother, Naval, it hit home.

He gave one of the best explanations I’ve heard of why Facebook (and others like Google) should have kept their neutrality, similarly to the phone companies of the past.

It’s worth a listen. Skip ahead to the 1:01:00 for that part.

Fortunately for Facebook, it has acquired so many peripheral companies (e.g. Instagram) that the mothership still has some life in her. But anytime you alienate a group you lose trust, and like a cheating spouse, trust is hard to earn back.

Facebook, as we knew it, is dead. The good news is what’s next.