The PTR 91 GI Model is a true Battle Rifle in every bit of the definition. It is durable, it has little recoil, it has great accuracy at range, and it is even modular. PTR really makes a winner with the 91 GI model. This rifle has a long history before PTR got their hands on the blueprints and started making them in the US. The design can be a little finicky if not properly maintained, but as long as you keep an eye on the headspace, lube it properly, and inspect it to make sure all the parts and welds are still solid, this design will last and last.

But to be able to take care of the design, we must first understand how it works.

The PTR 91 has served me well in the little time that I have been running it. It is designed to be a long-range sporting rifle, but with a barrel change and a wide forearm grip, I turned it into a fast battle rifle, ready to go to war. It is easy to operate, though it is not for those who don’t have the strength to yank and slap. You will notice that this rifle is a little heavy, but for a .308 battle rifle, it is quite well balanced.

There are several modifications that you can do in order to change this platform to your desired setup and capabilities, so don’t worry about modularity. But I must warn you, the PTR 91 is not comparable to the C308. This battle rifle is built way better and the company builds these the way they were meant to be made, by the same blueprints. They are not pieced together with random parts from the CETME and the G3s from all over. That can be dangerous and sketchy if you mess it up. Personally I would never gamble with the chance that they may have put a rifle together wrong. But it is your choice to decide: price or quality, as always.

For around $1000, you can’t really go wrong with the PTR 91. The mags are cheap, the parts are all over, and PTR Industries is quick to help. Check them out here.

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by David Donchess

David Served in the USMC, deployed twice, and got wounded. Retired and moved to Alaska. Has a passion for reviewing and testing guns and gear of all kinds. Enjoys working to dispel myths and show that you can train and practice in a realistic, safe, and practical way.