Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State (ISIS), is dead. He chose suicide over capture or death at the hands of the Delta operators and the Rangers. His death, however, doesn’t spell the end of the threat posed by the terrorist organization. ISIS might have lost huge swaths of land and be a caliphate no more – if it ever truly was – but it’s still dangerous. Its loyal minions have spread in the neighboring countries as well as in Europe, and perhaps even the States. And they are waiting for opportunities to strike. So this war isn’t over. Its overt and more visible aspects might have ended; but what is inarguably its most dangerous aspect is far from over.

The real threat of ISIS is philosophical. ISIS is an ideology more than an entity. The organization’s ability to rally disgruntled people around the world and make them commit terrorist attacks in their countries was and remains its most dangerous aspect. This realization begs the question of how you defeat an ideology?

People would argue for different remedies. For instance, establishing or enhancing democratic institutions or improving the socioeconomic level in an area or country where ISIS sympathizers might be residing (for example, France, the U.K., Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands). Such propositions, however, require multilateral action by countries whose interests are often competing, such as Turkey, Syria, Iran, and the U.S.