The public relations hits keep on coming for the Navy’s SEAL community, as a new report about an active duty SEAL acting in porn films joins a string of recent news stories in casting a shadow over Naval Special Warfare (NSW).

Recapping the latest salvos impacting the SEALs’ reputation, the Navy announced that there would be no criminal charges filed against a BUD/S instructor involved in the drowning death of BUD/S trainee James D. Lovelace last May.Though “good news” for the command, the headline nonetheless reminds the public of a tragic accident that occurred in the SEALs’ basic training program, thus calling into question its ability to keep its trainees safe while also subjecting them to a grueling training regiment.

Then there was the release of an explosive CBS News report last week detailing allegations of widespread drug use within NSW, and a failure of SEAL leadership to effectively deal with the problem.The Naval Special Warfare Command (NSWC) pushed back on that report, as cited in a Military.com article, offering their own statistics on drug testing within the community, as favorably compared to the statistics seen military-wide.Regardless of NSW’s defense, the blemish on the community’s image is not erased.

Additionally, further fanning the flames of the raging intra-NSW conflict over “selling the Trident,” self-proclaimed Osama Bin Ladin shooter Rob O’Neill is set to release his book “The Operator: Firing the Shots that Killed Osama Bin Ladin and My Years as a SEAL Team Warrior,” on April 25th.This will no doubt lead to more public bickering over capitalizing on the SEAL brand, which will surely play out in the press, as various SEALs insult each other and defend their rights to free speech, all the while doing nothing more than to further erode public opinion of the SEAL Teams.