According to the Washington Times, US SOF (Special Operations Forces) allegedly had the location of SGT Bowe Bergdahl, and even knew how many guards were present several times over the years but supposedly SOF commanders felt their troops were too valuable to “lose” for a deserter. This is according to high level intelligence officials. It is highly unlikely we’d send any SOF into Pakistan besides Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) personnel. For the record, it tales Presidential authorization to conduct operations in Pakistan.

After I recovered from an overwhelming sense of incredulity, I said BS!

I find it beyond belief that SOF said their lives weren’t worth losing over an American deserter. First, these consummate professionals don’t get to like or dislike those whom they rescue. I can only imagine some of the types SOF has been tasked to rescue or protect. Second, it’s not just Bergdahl whom they would have been saving. They would have been sending the message to everyone in uniform that we are coming for you, no matter what.

Sure, maybe an individual irate SOF member may have had an impolitic comment, but it’s doubtful that a high-ranking intelligence type heard a JSOC member griping about going on a rescue mission. It’s even more doubtful that an officer from that tight-knit community could lose sight of the larger issues.

This causes me to ask, why deflect on not using the JSOC military option? Besides the fact that they can’t defend themselves, is someone afraid that the question is looming in the future? Why didn’t we send in JSOC instead of trading five of the worst terrorists, who took untold resources to capture, and will likely pose a threat to those same JSOC elements in the future?

As I mentioned in my other essay, watch the efforts to sway opinion, including discrediting other options with innuendo or rumors about an organization that can’t or won’t speak in its defense.

(Featured Image Courtesy: our friends at ShadowSpear)

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