The U.S. Air Force could be soon wearing the same duty uniforms as the U.S. Army, the “MultiCam” according to documents that were on social media last week.

The documents, reportedly from the Air Force Uniform Office, suggest ditching the service’s “Airman Battle Uniform” in favor of the Army’s MultiCam “Operational Camouflage Pattern.”

The change would see airmen trade their digitized tiger stripes designed to mimic a Vietnam-era uniform for a brown-and-green pattern made for use in Afghanistan.

A uniform change could be announced in June with the changeover starting on Oct. 1, the documents say.

Air Force Capt. Kathleen Atanasoff, a Pentagon spokeswoman, confirmed in a statement last week that the service is looking at options for a new utility uniform but said no decision has been made.

“We regularly review uniform policy and gather feedback from airmen via a number of channels,” she said. “The Air Force uniform policy team and senior leaders are currently considering this feedback and working on possible courses of action.”

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One recommendation is that the Air Force, which adopted its current uniform in 2007, go with the OCP Army Combat Uniform, she said.

OCPs are already worn by airmen who deploy to Afghanistan and Iraq and in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

Some airmen at Yokota Air Base — home of U.S. Forces Japan and the 5th Air Force in western Tokyo — said they liked the idea of wearing MultiCam.

“It’s the best thing ever,” Staff Sgt. Jed Campbell, an air transportation craftsman for the 730th Air Mobility Squadron, said Tuesday. “Wearing [MultiCam] was something to look forward to about deploying to Afghanistan. They’re so much more comfortable.”

It makes more sense having the services in the same duty uniform and will ease on problems for resupplying the troops overseas. The washed out tiger stripe pattern that the Air Force is currently using doesn’t seem to blend very well anyway.

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Photo courtesy US Air Force