Fans of ESEE will remember we recently covered the Expat Cleaver. The Expat Cleaver was the first of many planned Expat knives designed by ESEE forum member and world traveler “Expat”. Like all Esee knives, the design comes from folks who are noted survival experts. At SHOT Show 2018 I had the chance to connect with the awesome crew at Randall’s Adventure/ESEE. There I saw the second and soon to be released third knife in the Expat line. Today we are talking about the second, the Expat Machete, known as the Libertariat.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

A Machete is a Machete right?

The Libertariat is a little different than the standard machete. It’s only 14 inches long, with a 9-inch blade. The end is squared off into a non-point and when sheathed it looks more akin to a fixed blade knife. The small size was to make it a light and easy to carry survival tool. It only weighs 13 ounces and it’s hard to notice on your belt. ESEE makes plenty of machetes, but the Expat Libertariat Machete is something entirely different. It’s small, easy to swing, and it slices and dices very well.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

Putting the Libertariat to Work

The Libertariat is a pretty machete. The wood handle, square blade and the Condor Classic finish just gel well together. When you consider the fact that the Libertariat is a limited run of only 550 machetes it seems crazy I wouldn’t make it a wall hanger. That’s just not our style. If you want to see pretty pictures of pretty gear there are plenty of magazines and websites for that.

Instead, I cut a tree down.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

The Libertariat is a working tool that just happens to be a limited edition and eye pleasing. My first bit of work was to be clearing a small section of brush I have in my backyard growing around a tree stump and a boulder. With my son’s infinite six-year-old imagination the tree stump and boulder have become a playground for him. It certainly needed a good debrushing.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form
Started Here

I used the Libertariat and only the Libertariat Machete to put to work. I sliced and diced through vines, palmettos, and even cut down low hanging branches that were several inches thick. Even with stopping to take photos it took me less than an hour. Once you master the proper means to chop and slash it becomes easy to chew through what was in front of it.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form
Ended Here

Surprisingly enough the handle staid comfortable and I never felt hot spots, or discomfort when chopping.

Stacking Wood

That tree I cut down earlier… Well, I decided I needed to chop it up a bit. So I made a nice little pile for burning a bit later. Admittedly midway through chopping through this log my hand was a little tired. That’s an exaggeration, my hand was tired as hell. My right hand is still tired as I type this.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

Using it to Baton Wood

The Libertariat’s spine is thick and flat which makes it nice for batoning wood. Batoning wood is basically splitting wood with a knife. You plant the Expat Machete’s blade into the wood and use a second log to hammer the blade through the wood. Being capable of doing this makes the Liberteriat a mini hand ax when necessary. I haven’t batonned much wood in my life, but I figured it out pretty quickly when wielding the Libertariat.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

A Draw Knife

The hole in the top portion of the blade isn’t there to reduce weight, or to allow you to hand the machete up, it there to turn the Expat machete into a draw knife. Or at least as close as you can get to a draw knife.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

You stick a strong stick through the hole and use it as a secondary handle. Then you use the machete to strip the bark from a tree or to shave off tinder. This isn’t as easy as a real draw knife of course, but in a pinch, it works. It’s not a woodworking tool, but a survival tool, so remember that carpenters.

Striking a Match

The Expat machete features a 90 degree curved spine which may not mean much to you if this is a yard working tool. However, for a survival or camping tool it’s a nice touch. It makes striking a ferro rod for fire easy and possible. The blade is short enough that this isn’t a hazard and the sharp corner of the spine makes it easy to strike a ferro rod.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

Downsides

The only downside I really have is the sheath. While it’s completely suitable as a sheath and carries the machete well, it just comes up to high. It eats half the handle, and pulling it out is a little tricky. A minor complaint for a fantastic knife.

ESEE's Expat Libertariat - A Force Of Nature in Machete Form

Final Thoughts

Overall the Libertariat is a robust, and capable machete. It’s like Joe Pesci in Goodfellas, little but fierce. It’s strong, sharp, and an excellent bushcraft tool. If you need to hack through small trees, vines, limbs, and more It’s up to the task.

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