Tonight I went out in the cold and ruck ran about four miles. It’s been cold on the east coast and because of this area, DC, is like a swamp the cold is bitter. But, that Ruck warms you up, quickly, and I barely noticed it was cold out. I enjoy Rucking more than I do running. Probably because, with my build, it’s easier for me to be relatively fast Rucking than Running. But, also, it feels more like work and it’s simply harder to accomplish. It’s heavy, and it sucks. It requires a deeper level of focus when your body begins to ache.

Also, I can feel every step and my feet land. It’s easier to control my form, or rather ensure I’m landing mid-foot and using my hamstrings and butt for a full stride. When I catch myself leaning too forward, or relying on my Quadriceps, I can feel it. That’s when I know I’m going to make life difficult on my knees and shins.

If you aren’t rucking in boots, then wear shoes that have a substantial level of cushioning. That’s what I did last night. I wore Hoka One One Clifton’s instead of my Nike SFB’s. The Hokies worked fine, and to some degree, I could feel my feet getting a level of conditioning they don’t believe in boots because they’re forced to flex more underweight when they hit the ground in running shoes than boots.

Obviously, you’d go to selection in Boots, but it’s not a loss if you end up Rucking in shoes, either.

Here’s the training for today. 

Training 12.19.16:

Rucking advice from a former Green Beret

Read Next: Rucking advice from a former Green Beret

1) 750 min. – 1,000 max. Steps up @45 lb. Ruck

2) Optional: 3 mile run at a conversational pace. Then, foam roll your legs or use the stick, baseball bat, or something similar, to loosen up the acid building up in your muscle tissue. Think of it like muscle hygiene like flossing is for your teeth.