The trucks still rumble across the Sino-Korean Friendship Bridge, and a nearby pipeline still pumps crude oil to keep the regime alive in Pyongyang.

But here in the Chinese city of Dandong, at the center of this country’s trade with North Korea, pain and frustration are mounting.

Sanctions approved by the United Nations Security Council to punish North Korea for its nuclear and missile tests and bring it to the negotiating table are starting to bite.

“Personally, the sanctions are hurting me a tremendous amount,” one Chinese trader said, explaining that almost 80 percent of the goods he used to send back and forth across the border — ranging from textiles to chemicals — are now forbidden.

 

Read the whole story from The Washington Post

Featured image courtesy of AP

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