Boeing could hardly step into a more sensitive, touchy deal than the imminent agreement to sell about 100 passenger jets to the Islamic Republic of Iran.

With the sale, Boeing faces unique political risks here in the United States — with potential blowback among Americans opposed to last year’s agreement to limit Iran’s nuclear program and possible snapback of international sanctions if Iran violates the nuclear pact.

Already, members of Congress are denouncing the deal. House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Tex.) said institutions that consider financing the sales “should ask whether it is in their long-term interests to profit from doing business with the world’s foremost state sponsor of terrorism. It’s not American jobs that are on the line, but potentially American lives.”

In Iran, feelings remain raw, too. Some Iranian leaders still complain about the “great Satan” and question the U.S. commitment to ease trade restrictions as promised under the nuclear accord.

Read More: Washington Post

Image courtesy of Bloomberg

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