The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to hear a challenge to Connecticut’s ban on semi-automatic rifles commonly called assault weapons, acting a little over week after the mass shooting in Orlando was carried with such a firearm.

Gov. Dan Malloy signed the law in April 2013. Four months earlier, a shooting rampage at Sandy Hook Elementary School killed 20 children and six teachers. The law expanded an existing ban by outlawing dozens of rifle models than can hold high-capacity ammunition magazines or clips.

The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to hear a challenge to Connecticut’s ban on semi-automatic rifles commonly called assault weapons, acting a little over week after the mass shooting in Orlando was carried with such a firearm.

Gov. Dan Malloy signed the law in April 2013. Four months earlier, a shooting rampage at Sandy Hook Elementary School killed 20 children and six teachers. The law expanded an existing ban by outlawing dozens of rifle models than can hold high-capacity ammunition magazines or clips.

When used in crimes, the rifles “result in more shots being fired, more people being shot, and more gun death.”

The challengers, who lost in the lower courts, said the ban violates the Second Amendment right to own a gun. If it did anything to cut down on gun crime, it would achieve that effect only by simple arithmetic — reducing the number of constitutionally protected rifles.

Read more at nbcnews.com

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