The U.S. Navy slapped a drinking ban on sailors stationed in Japan on Monday and halted off base liberty after police arrested a U.S. sailor on the southern island of Okinawa on suspicion of drunk driving following a car crash that injured two people.

For decades we have enjoyed a strong relationship with the people of Japan. It is imperative that each sailor understand how our actions affect that relationship and the U.S. Japan alliance as a whole, Rear Admiral Matthew Carter, commander of U.S. naval forces in Japan said in a press release on Monday.

The United States has 18,600 sailors stationed in Japan.

The latest incident came as the U.S. military observes a 30-day mourning period at bases on Okinawa after an American civilian working for the U.S. military there was arrested on suspicion of dumping the body of a 20-year-old Japanese woman.

Renewed anger among residents in Okinawa at the U.S. military presence threatens a plan to relocate the U.S. Marines’ Futenma air base to a less populous part of Okinawa, which was agreed in 1995 after the rape of a Japanese schoolgirl by U.S. military personnel sparked huge anti-base demonstrations.

Okinawa’s governor and many residents want the marines off the island.

All U.S. Navy sailors in Japan will be kept on base and banned from drinking until,

2 more Marine Corps helicopters have gone down in Okinawa since Saturday

Read Next: 2 more Marine Corps helicopters have gone down in Okinawa since Saturday

All personnel understand the impact of responsible behavior on the U.S.-Japan alliance, the press release said. Sailors living off base will be allowed to travel to and from base and conduct only essential activities.

Read More: Reuters

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